Web site: www.coe.int/media

Strasbourg, 19 November 2010

CDMC(2010)017
Franais
Pdf

 
 

STEERING COMMITTEE ON THE MEDIA
AND NEW COMMUNICATION SERVICES

(CDMC)

______

13th meeting
from 16 to 19 November 2010
Council of Europe, Agora building, Strasbourg
(Room G01)

Abridged meeting report

______

The Steering Committee on the Media and New Communication Services (CDMC) held its 13th meeting, chaired by Ms Delia Mucică (Romania), from 16 to 19 November 2010.

Gender distribution: 62 attendants, 21 women (33.87%), 41 men (66.13%).

During the meeting, the CDMC

For Committee of Ministers’ decision

Gender equality
- decided to draw attention of the Committee of Ministers to the magnitude and the multi-disciplinary nature of gender mainstreaming in the media and freedom of expression standard-setting field, a particularly telling example being media coverage of election campaigns; invited the Committee of Ministers to consider the opportunity of setting up a suitably resourced transversal project in this respect and, if it has not already been done, to invite the Secretary General to incorporate a distinct gender equality perspective in the ongoing reform process;

European Convention on Transfrontier Television
- reiterated its concern in respect of the current standstill in the revision of the Convention and expressed support for work designed to identify solutions which meet the needs of member states and avoid a legal vacuum in respect of broadcasting from places not bound by European Union law and the possibly undesirable consequences to the European audiovisual media landscape; asked the Committee of Ministers to accord due priority to this work;

For information

Parliamentary Assembly Recommendations
- agreed on comments on the following: (i) Recommendation 1931(2010) “Combating sexist stereotypes in the media” (appendix I); (ii) Recommendation 1933(2010) “Fight against extremism: achievements, deficiencies and failures” (appendix II); (iii) Recommendation 1934(2010) “Child abuse in institutions: ensure full protection of the victims” (appendix III); and (iv) Recommendation 1936(2010) “Human rights and business” (appendix IV);

Subordinate bodies
- took note of the on-going work of its subordinate bodies and supported their proposals as follows:
the Committee of Experts on New Media (MC-NM) to submit by the next CDMC meeting (June 2011) two draft recommendations accompanied by self-regulatory guidelines on the protection of human rights with regards to (i) search engines and (ii) social networks service providers;
the Ad hoc Advisory Group on Public Service Media Governance (MC-S-PG) to submit by the next CDMC meeting a draft declaration and a draft recommendation on the governance of public service media, the latter accompanied by a substantial policy document;
the Ad hoc Advisory Group on Cross-border Internet (MC-S-CI) to submit by the next CDMC meeting a draft declaration on general principles of Internet governance and a draft recommendation on rights, responsibilities and duties of states in respect of critical Internet resources in a cross-border context; during the preparatory process, a conference will be organised to discuss with government representatives, including states which are not members of the Council of Europe, key industry actors and relevant academics the content of those drafts and explore possible further action to be taken on the subject;
- agreed that the non-governmental organisation Article 19 be given observer status with the MC-S-PG;
- confirmed that the Ad hoc Advisory Group on Neighbouring Rights of Broadcasting Organisations (MC-S-NR) should only resume work once the European Commission has been mandated to negotiate within a Council of Europe framework a convention on the protection of neighbouring rights of broadcasting organisations;

Work programme for 2011 and beyond
- conducted a mid-term assessment of the implementation of the Reykjavik proposals for action and decided on priorities;
- upon the proposal of the European Internet Service Providers Association (EuroISPA), asked the MC-NM to consider possible follow-up in standard-setting terms to the 2008 Human right guidelines for Internet service providers;
- decided to pursue work, in consultation with relevant Council of Europe bodies, with the aim of providing guidance to member states, possibly in the form of a Committee of Ministers recommendation, for the review of their anti-terrorism legislation and practice and their impact on freedom of expression and information;
- decided to explore possible standard-setting responses to the problem of jurisdiction and forum shopping in respect of defamation (also known as libel tourism) in consultation with other competent Council of Europe bodies;
- resources permitting, decided to pursue the revision of existing standard-setting texts from a gender perspective, in consultation with relevant Council of Europe bodies; it supported the proposal of a mixed CDMC-CDEG group with a view to preparing a draft handbook on strategies to combat gender stereotypes in the media;
- decided to ask the Secretary General of the Council of Europe to accept the invitation by Serbia to host the second Council of Europe Conference of Ministers responsible for media and new communication services and decided to start preparing it subject to decisions yet to be taken by the Committee of Ministers as to priorities and process;

Working methods
- welcomed the strategy proposed by the Secretary General for engagement with civil society which largely coincides with the CDMC’s own approach and reflections on an architecture for participation in its own work;

Elections
- elected Andris Mellakauls (Latvia) as its Chairperson and Elfa Yr Gylfadottir (Iceland) as its Vice-Chairperson; re-elected Emir Povlakic (Bosnia Herzegovina) for a second two-years mandate and elected Thomas Schneider (Switzerland) and Els Hendrix (Germany) as Bureau members; resulting in a 3 women / 4 men gender distribution.

Other issues
- welcomed the appointment of and held an exchange of views with the new Committee of Ministers Thematic Coordinator on Information Policy, Ambassador Hajnoczi, whose broadened mandate extends to CDMC work;
- took note of the Council of Europe activities carried out during the 5th Internet Governance Forum (IGF) (Vilnius, 14-17 September 2010) and welcomed the organisation of the 3rd European Dialogue on Internet Governance (EuroDIG) (to be held in Belgrade on 30 and 31 May 2011).

APPENDIX I

Comments by the
Steering Committee on the Media and New Communication Services (CDMC)
on Parliamentary Assembly Recommendation 1931 (2010)
“Combating sexist stereotypes in the media”

    1. The CDMC welcomes Parliamentary Assembly Recommendation 1931 (2010) on Combating sexist stereotypes in the media. The recommendation is well-timed, since the question of gender stereotyping in the media is unresolved and examples can be found of degrading or humiliating images of both men and women, especially in entertainment and advertising. However, the CDMC does not share the sometimes heavy-handed approach proposed in the underlying Resolution 1751 (2010), in particular when calling on national Parliaments to combat sexist stereotypes in the media by penalising sexist remarks or insults. This may not be consistent with the right to freedom of expression requirements set out in Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights and related case law.
    2. Respect for human dignity and equality are fundamental principles of a genuine democratic society. They comprise also a sound basis for the operation of socially effective and responsible media aiming at creating a culture of tolerance and harmony among various groups and individuals.
    3. The CDMC shares the opinion that avoiding stereotypes and an objective presentation of facts and images should be a fundamental objective for any type of media and journalistic work as an element of their public function. This will only be achieved through a constant endeavour to present different persons with their own characteristics, peculiarities and sensibilities, with their ambitions and accomplishments. In this regard, the CDMC stresses the importance of combating sexist stereotypes while considering freedom of expression and information and editorial independence.
    4. Public service media (PSM) can have an important function in combating sexist stereotypes in the media, because of their important role in integrating all communities, social groups and generations. With regard to this, the recommendation Rec (2007)3 on the remit of public service media in the information society, underlines the fact that PSM should serve social integration and should respect different identities and needs “paying due attention to gender equality issue”.
    5. Community media can be an essential factor for social cohesion which brings together various groups, communities and persons with different identities at a local and regional level as emphasised by the 2009 Committee of Ministers Declaration on the role of community media in promoting social cohesion and intercultural dialogue.
    6. As regards the proliferation of the new communication services, the CDMC considers desirable a creative media environment on the Internet which respects the dignity of all persons and especially of children. The broad availability of pornography on the Internet and the existing sexist stereotypes in the video material and advertisements carry risk of harm for younger people and may impair their proper understanding of the contribution and role of individuals of different gender. Reference might be made in this respect to relevant provisions of the European Convention on Transfrontier Television and to the 2004 Recommendation of the Convention’s Standing Committee, which address comparable issues, and also to the Committee of Ministers Recommendation No. R (89) 7 concerning principles on the distribution of videograms having a violent, brutal or pornographic content and, as regards online games, to the Human rights guidelines for online games providers developed by the CDMC in co-operation with the Interactive Software Federation of Europe (2008).

    7. The CDMC considers that a comprehensive and wide-ranging strategy is necessary to combat sexist stereotypes in both traditional and new media, which demands involvement of all interested parties. Avoiding sexist stereotypes can be understood in relation to intercultural dialogue and the proper implementation of its principles as it is crucial how persons with various identities are presented in different cultures and traditions.
    8. Member states could summarise and exchange good practices in combating sexist stereotypes in the media.. It goes without saying that any regulatory measures should comply fully with the Article 10 requirements, namely they must be prescribed by law necessary in a democratic society and proportionate to the legitimate aims pursued. Gender issues might be included among the indicators established by the media regulatory authorities or authorities responsible for gender equality for the proper evaluation of media performance. Attention should also be paid to distinguishing enabling measures for the media as a whole as opposed to possibly undue attempts to regulate content.
    9. Dealing with gender stereotypes will contribute to reducing inequality, including gender violence which is one of its most unacceptable expressions. Given that addressing this issue effectively will inevitably have to take account of the fundamental principle of media’s independence, purely regulatory measures may not provide a satisfactory response. The task therefore falls largely to the media themselves which have to incorporate the principle of equal presentation and fair treatment of various persons with their specific identities in their professional codes and self-regulatory mechanisms and to combat stereotypes as an everyday practice. It may be even more effective to consider solutions through governance models and approaches. The CDMC is already working on the question of public service media governance which may provide some elements of response in this connection.
    10. The CDMC encourages member states, civil organisations and the media to pay due attention to media literacy as a fundamental competence for citizens of all ages in the new, complex and sometimes controversial media environment. Media education and training can boost professionalism and sensitivity of the media and enable media consumers to recognise and deal with gender stereotypes and discrimination in all media formats. In the online environment, it can help Internet users and young people in particular to comprehend better the complexities of the virtual reality and its risks, especially those connected to gender equality.
    11. The CDMC is ready to participate in cross-sectoral initiatives to explore more profoundly matters related to the intersection between gender and media, as already proposed in the texts adopted at the last Council of Europe specialised ministerial conference on equality between men and women. In this context, the CDMC is determined to explore the gender perspective in its work. This extends also to reviewing previously adopted standard-setting texts from a gender perspective. The CDMC counts on the support from the Committee of Ministers for this.

APPENDIX II

Comments
by the Steering Committee on the Media and New Communication Services (CDMC)
on Parliamentary Assembly Recommendation 1933 (2010)
“Fight against extremism, achievements, deficiencies and failures

    1. The CDMC welcomes Parliamentary Assembly Recommendation 1933 (2010) on the fight against extremism: achievements, deficiencies and failures and its preceding resolution. The recommendation is well-timed, especially in the light of recent developments, whereby certain political parties have been elected to European parliaments on what could be described as an extremist platform.
    2. The timing of the recommendation is particularly apt given the current global financial crisis and recession, which has led to a growing number of manifestations of racism and xenophobia.
    3. The CDMC shares the view that, in multicultural societies, it is often necessary to reconcile freedom of expression and freedom of thought, conscience and religion as indicated, for example, in PACE Recommendation 1805 (2007) on Blasphemy, religious insults and hate speech against persons on the ground of their religion, and as in the instant Recommendation at paragraphs 2 and 4.
    4. The CDMC also acknowledges that in particular circumstances, restrictions on these fundamental freedoms may be necessary, but these must be prescribed by law, necessary in a democratic society and proportionate to the legitimate aims pursued. Any restrictive measures should be narrowly circumscribed and be of limited duration. When addressing extremism, a controversial issue which may be open to different interpretations, strict application of the rule of law is essential for the protection of freedom of expression and opinion. The CDMC would in particular recall that, according to the case law of the European Court of Human Rights, subject to the conditions of paragraph 2 of Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights, the right to freedom of expression is applicable not only to information or ideas that are favourably received or regarded as inoffensive or as a matter of indifference, but also to those that offend, shock or disturb.
    5. The Recommendation rightly urges (5.1) the Council of Ministers to evaluate member states’ compliance with Recommendation (97)20 on “hate speech”. Although in the instant Recommendation there is no specific mention of the media, R(97)20 affirms that public authorities and institutions have a “special responsibility to refrain from statements [...], speech [...] and other forms of discrimination or hatred based on intolerance” (Principle 1), especially when it is disseminated through the media.
    6. The CDMC welcomes the invitation (5.2) to the relevant Council of Europe bodies to monitor compliance of anti-extremism legislation with international human rights standards. In this context there could be synergies with the CDMC’s work on a follow-up to the Reykjavik Ministerial Conference 2009 Resolution on Developments in anti-terrorism legislation in Council of Europe member states and their impact on freedom of expression and information.
    7. It should not be forgotten that 27 of the 47 Council of Europe member states are also Member States of the European Union. In this context, the CDMC would recall that the work programme of the EU’s Fundamental Rights Agency includes the first priority project “Reporting on the situation concerning racism, xenophobia, anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, related intolerance and other fundamental rights issues”. The CDMC suggests that synergies could be achieved by drawing upon the experience and research findings of the FRA which have a bearing on the Recommendation under discussion.

(www.fra.europa.eu/fraWebsite/attachments/AWP_2011_final_clear_EN.pdf)

    8. Noting the Assembly’s call for various Council of Europe bodies to take on a greater work load (5.1 – 5.5), the CDMC would emphasise the need to ensure adequate resources, both financial and human, to pursue these activities. The CDMC would also suggest that the monitoring tasks envisaged in the Recommendation be coordinated to avoid possible overlap and duplication. This might be achieved through an annual or bi-annual meeting of the relevant Council of Europe bodies and other stakeholders.
    9. Finally, the CDMC considers this recommendation and the resolution upon which it is based to be a timely and useful reminder to member states that much still needs to be done in the fight against extremism. Subject to an adequate response to the resource question mentioned in paragraph 8, the Council of Europe can play a very important role in accompanying and promoting member states’ efforts in this regard.

APPENDIX III

Comments by
the Steering Committee on the Media and New Communication Services (CDMC)
on
Parliamentary Recommendation 1934(2010):
“Child abuse in institutions: ensuring full protection of the victims”

1. The CDMC welcomes the opportunity to provide comments on Parliamentary Assembly (PACE) Recommendation 1934 (2010) on child abuse in institutions: ensuring full protection of the victims. While the subject matter is not within the remit of the CDMC, this is an opportunity to give concrete meaning to some of its comments on a previous PACE Recommendation (Recommendation 1916 (2010) on the protection of whistle-blowers).

2. As has been clearly stated by the Assembly “No authority or institution should be exempt from critical review”. The watchdog function of the media and the importance of freedom of expression and the right of access to information are of capital importance in this respect. In this area more than in any other, freedom of expression and its corollary, freedom of the media, has to be exercised with full regard to the responsibilities that accompany these rights.

3. Journalists ethics and self-regulation will be decisive in ensuring accurate and balanced reporting in the public interest while, at the same time, respecting the presumption of innocence and the dignity, the security and the right to privacy of both victims or claimants on the one hand, and suspects, accused, convicted persons and witnesses on the other hand. The interests of children are fundamental in this connection. The 2003 Committee of Ministers Declaration on the provision of information through the media in relation to criminal proceedings and the related Recommendation Rec(2003)13 provide useful guidance in this respect.

4. Comprehensive legislation and guidelines designed to protect whistleblowers, as suggested by the Parliamentary Assembly in its Recommendation 1916 (2010), would assist in uncovering and preventing child abuse in institutions. The CDMC would underline, once again, the relationship between whistleblowers and media. They are natural partners in the process of exposing wrongdoings and ensuring the accountability of both public officials and private citizens, as well as of the organisations within which they operate. Recent disclosures have abundantly demonstrated the positive value for society of whistleblowing, including in the context of security agencies and religious communities.

5. Whistleblowing journalism related to human rights and fundamental freedoms, which also refers to violations of children’s rights in institutions, as well as in respect of issues of broad or even global interest, merits particular attention and protection. This extends to situations where whistleblowers are the victims of retaliation and reprisals from within or outside the institution or organisation in question. The relationship of trust, based on the understanding that journalistic sources will not be disclosed, must be preserved.

6. This matter has been addressed in broad terms in several media-related Council of Europe documents, for example the Committee of Ministers 2007 Declaration on the protection and promotion of investigative journalism, the Recommendation No. R (2000)7 on the right of journalists not to disclose their sources of information and the 2003 Declaration on freedom of communication on the Internet. The CDMC would stress, in particular, that the effective protection of journalists’ sources is an essential tool for the media to uncover child abuse in institutions. Whistleblowing and investigative journalism are powerful means for sustaining good governance, transparency, accountability and rule of law in all institutions.

7. The CDMC is determined to explore the gender perspective in all its work and output. In this particular context, beyond the specific vulnerability of girls and young females in institutions, the CDMC wishes to signify that female whistleblowers usually risk greater levels of retaliation than their male equivalents because of their lower status in corporate culture. Particular attention should therefore be paid to the desirability for female staff to be both in post in sufficient numbers in institutions for children and to be adequately protected against harassment, retaliation or abuse as a means of preventing the uncovering of abuse of children.

8. The CDMC supports the recommendation concerning “raising awareness about child abuse in the institutional context, including through public information campaigns” while respecting media’s editorial independence. With vigorous (including financial) support from Council of Europe member states, Europe-wide, all-platform action could be promoted in this respect in a public service media context with the assistance of the European Broadcasting Union.

9. Moreover, media and new communication services, including the Internet, can help children inform themselves about their rights; they can also help empower children both to resist and protect themselves form abuse and to complain about abuse and ensure that those responsible are brought to account. Reference can be made in this respect to Committee of Ministers adopted standard-setting instruments such as Recommendation Rec(2006)12 on empowering children in the new information and communications environment or Recommendation CM/Rec(2009)5 on measures to protect children against harmful content and behaviour and to promote their active participation in the new information and communications environment. These matters could be explored further with the European Network of Ombudspersons for Children (ENOC) given that their recent annual meeting focused on “Listening to children and involving them in the promotion and implementation of their rights”. The role of human rights defenders might also be usefully considered in this context.

APPENDIX IV

Comments by
the Steering Committee on the Media and New Communication Services (CDMC)
on
Parliamentary Recommendation 1936 (2010):
“Human rights and business”

1. The Steering Committee on the Media and New Communication Services (CDMC) is thankful to the Parliamentary Assembly for providing this opportunity to comment on Recommendation 1936 (2010) on human rights and business, which is timely and very relevant to ongoing developments and debates in respect of the information society and media.

2. The CDMC shares the view that the Council of Europe is well placed to promote corporate responsibility in the area of human rights. In this context, the CDMC recalls that many of the Committee of Ministers’ standard-setting instruments concerning Internet and information society underline the roles and responsibilities of private sector in respecting human rights.1

3. Internet governance is perhaps an exemplary area in the Council of Europe activities where the relationship between human rights and roles and responsibilities of business has been articulated in an authoritative way. The notion of the public service value of the Internet as laid down in the CM/Rec(2007)162 provides inspiration for the development of Internet governance policies.3 The Declaration of the Committee of Ministers on network neutrality and the Declaration on the management of Internet protocol addresses in the public interest signal the need for action to protect human rights in respect of management of the Internet.

4. Partnerships with the business community have produced tangible results such as the Human Rights Guidelines for ISPs and Human Rights Guidelines for Online Games Providers – developed by the Council of Europe in cooperation with the European Association of Internet Services Providers (EuroISPA) and the Interactive Software Federation in Europe (ISFE). Similar guidelines are under preparation in respect of Internet social network services and search engines. Further, the Council of Europe recently joined as observer the Governmental Advisory Committee of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Number4 which is responsible for the management of critical Internet resources for the global Internet community, as a means of bringing the Organisation’s core values into relevant discussions and decision-making processes.

5. In the new media environment, the responsibility of businesses in terms of protection of privacy and freedom of expression both in online and offline environments is of utmost importance. Internet users must be thoroughly and fairly informed about various services and goods, as well as the risks of data retention, processing of personal data and privacy settings, and of surreptitious, subliminal or otherwise manipulative practices. Special attention has to be paid to the sensitivity and health of children. The CDMC shares the view that the modernisation of the Convention for the Protection of Individuals with regard to Automatic Processing of Personal Data (ETS no.108) should be a priority (paragraph 2.5) and refers to its Comments on the draft Recommendation on the protection of individuals with regard to automatic processing of personal data in the context of profiling as finalised by the Bureau of the European Committee on Legal Co-operation (CDMC(2010)009rev).
6. The recommendation to “examine the feasibility of elaborating a complementary legal instrument, such as a convention or an additional protocol to the European Convention on Human Rights” advances a vision that could well bring a major shift not only in the system of corporate responsibility but also in the governance system of human rights. International regulation of corporations in respect of human rights as well as “direct human rights obligations on business that would be actionable in the same way as they are under the European Convention of Human Rights against states” (as explained in the Assembly’s Doc. 12361) may lead to simultaneous public and private centres of governance (polycentric multi-level system of governance).
7. The CDMC considers that the Recommendation makes a remarkable step forward in promoting a shift in the thinking on corporate responsibility from the legally unenforceable concepts of corporate responsibility that we know today to a comprehensive transnational regulatory framework for business enterprises. The CDMC would have very serious concerns if such an approach were in any way to offer an alibi for shifting responsibility for protecting freedom of expression and information and other human rights away from the state, but would see merit in a construct that would strengthen the actual protection of human rights under international law by extending, rather than shifting, responsibility to non-state actors. The CDMC therefore looks forward to the outcome of consideration of how the vision embodied in the Recommendation can be articulated; it feels that the governance dimension should be part of the envisaged feasibility study.

8. The CDMC would welcome, from the perspective of its own responsibilities in respect of freedom of expression and information, a comprehensive study on corporate responsibilities in the area of human rights taking into account in particular the case law of the European Court of Human Rights and the decisions of the European Committee of Social Rights in order to provide necessary data for further actions, such as preparation of the intended recommendation on corporate responsibilities in the area of human rights and the guidelines for national authorities, businesses and other actors.

9. The CDMC is determined to explore the gender perspective in all its work and output. This is all the more relevant on this occasion as it has noted that the Steering Committee for Equality between Women and Men (CDEG) has not been invited to comment on this Parliamentary Assembly Recommendation. It therefore suggests that the gender perspective should be an integral part of any further work by the Council of Europe in light of the Assembly’s Recommendation.

10. In conclusion, the CDMC welcomes the Assembly’s Recommendation to the Committee of Ministers and stands ready to cooperate with all competent bodies in its follow up. In particular, the CDMC supports the recommendation to examine ways and means of developing partnerships with the business community in order to promote the Council of Europe’s values and standards. As mentioned in paragraph 4, this approach has already rendered tangible results. Incorporating Council of Europe standards into corporate operational tools (and into corporate social responsibility related practice) is a highly desirable objective. Assisting businesses in this respect could be seen as a major opportunity for the Organisation to further enhance its relevance, added value and impact. The Council of Europe can play a very important role in this regard, provided that adequate resources are made available.

APPENDIX V

MEETING AGENDA

1) Opening of the meeting

2) Adoption of the agenda

3) Decisions of the Committee of Ministers of interest to the work of the CDMC

4) Draft instruments or texts for consideration by the CDMC

5) Implementation of Council of Europe standards on media and freedom of expression prepared under the authority of the CDMC

6) Work of CDMC subordinate bodies

7) Hearing on defamation and forum shopping

8) Work programme for the CDMC in 2010 and 2011

9) Working methods

10) Next Council of Europe Conference of Ministers responsible for Media and New Communication Services

11) Internet Governance and implementation of WSIS action lines

12) Standing Committee on Transfrontier Television (T-TT)

13) Information on the work of, and co-operation with, other Council of Europe bodies, of interest to the CDMC

14) Other information of interest to the work of the CDMC

15) Elections

16) Administrative and budgetary matters

17) Items to be included on the agenda of the 14th meeting of the CDMC

18) Dates of next meetings

19) Other business

20) Abridged report

APPENDIX VI

LIST OF PARTICIPANTS

MEMBER STATES / ETATS MEMBRES

Albania/Albanie
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Ralf GJONI, Director General of Communications/ Spokesperson, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Albania

Armenia/Armnie
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Garegin CHUGASZYAN, Executive Director, IT Foundation

Austria/Autriche
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Andreas ULRICH, Federal Chancellery

Azerbaijan
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Ms Jeyran AMIRASLANOVA, Senior Consultant for Public and Political Issues, Office of the President of the Republic of Azerbaijan
Mr Araz ALIYEV (observer), Chief Consultant of "AzelIsh" Ltd

Belgium/Belgique
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr. Johan BOUCIQUE, Adviseur Media, Department Cultuur, Jeugd, Sport en Media

Bosnia and Herzegovina / Bosnie-Herzgovine
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Emir POVLAKIC, Head of Division for Licencing, Digitalization and Coordiation, Broadcasting Communications Regulatory Agency
Ms Lea TAJIĆ, Broadcasting Communications Regulatory Agency

Bulgaria/Bulgarie
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Ms Bissera ZANKOVA, Media Consultant, Ministry of Transport and Communications, Directorate on Information Technology

Croatia/Croatie
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Tomislav TUDIĆ, Human Rights Officer, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and European Integration of the Republic of Croatia

Cyprus/Chypre
Apologised / Excus

Czech Republic/Rpublique Tchque
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Marin ORAVEC, Media and Audio-Visual Department

Denmark/Danemark
(Confirmed/Confirm)(16-17 only)
Ms Katja JUST MAARBJERG, Head of Section, Danish Ministry of Culture
Ms Pernille RAHBEK, Chief Adviser, Danish Ministry of Culture

Estonia/Estonie
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Peeter SOOKRUUS, Ministry of Culture

Finland/Finlande
(Confirmed/Confirm) (17-19 only)
Ms Kristina HAUTALA-KAJOS, Counsellor for Cultural Affairs, Ministry of Education and Culture

France
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mme Sophie VERRIER, Bureau des affaires europennes et internationales, Direction Gnrale des Mdias et des Industries Culturelles, Ministre de la Culture et de la Communication

Georgia/Georgie
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Ms Tamar KINTSURASHVILI, Administration of the President of Georgia, Advisor

Germany/Allemagne
(Confirmed/Confirm – 19 Nov)
Mr Wolfgang WOHNHAS, Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and the Media
(Confirmed/Confirm – 16-18 Nov)
Ms Elx HENDRIX, Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and the Media
(Confirmed/Confirm – 16-18 Nov)
Ms Amlie ŞAHIN, Medienreferentin, VERTRETUNG DES LANDES RHEINLAND-PFALZ IN BRSSEL

Greece/Grce
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Christophoros A GEORGHADJIS, Secretariat General of Information, Secretariat of Communication, Media Expert, Media department

Hungary/Hongrie
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Dr Bence BODNAR, Head of Section, Audiovisual Media, Ministry of National Development
Dr Gyrgy OCSK, Head of Department, International & Parliamentary Relations
National Media and Info-communications Authority
 
Iceland/Islande
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Ms Elfa Yr GYLFADTTIR, Head of Division of Media, Department of Cultural affairs, Ministry of Education, Science and Culture

Ireland/Irlande
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Eanna O’CONGHAILE, Broadcasting Policy Division, Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources

Italy / Italie
(Confirmed/Confirm)
M. Pierluigi MAZZELLA, Professor of Information and Communication, University of Rome

Latvia/Lettonie
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Andris MELLAKAULS, Member, Head of International Relations, National Broadcasting Council of Latvia

Luxembourg
(Confirmed/Confirm) (17-18 only)
Ms Michle BRAM, Service des Mdias et des Communications

Moldova
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Ms Rodica PETROV, Director of Council of Europe and Human Rights Directorate, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and European Integration

Montenegro
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Ranko VUJOVIC, Executive Director UNEM

Netherlands/Pays-Bas
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr A D REIJNDERS, Deputy Head of Media Policy, Department for Media, Literature and Libraries

Norway/Norvge
(Apologised / Excus)

Poland/Pologne
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Wojciech KOLODZIEJCZYK, Lawyer, Legal Department, National Broacsting Council, National Broadcasting of Poland

Portugal
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Lus Santos FERRO, Adviser, GMCS – Gabinete para os Meios de Comunicao Social
Ms Maria Margarida RIBES, GMCS – Gabinete para os Meios de Comunicao Social

Romania/Roumanie
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Ms Delia MUCICĂ, Senior Advisor to the Minister of Culture (Chair)

Russian Federation/Fdration de Russie
Mr Igor EVDOKIMOV, Deputy Director, Information and Press Department, Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Serbia
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Ms Maja RAKOVIC, Cabinet of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Slovak Republic/Rpublique Slovaque
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Ms Natasa SLAVIKOVA, Ministry for Culture of the Slovak Republic

Slovenia/Slovenie
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Skender ADEM, Undersecretary, Ministry of Culture of Republic of Slovenia, Ljubljana

Spain/Espagne
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Ms M Concepcin SOTO CALVO, Adviser of Audiovisual Services, State Secretariat for Telecommunications and the Information Society, Madrid

Sweden / Suede
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Jerker STATTIN, Deputy Director, Swedish Ministry of Culture

Switzerland/Suisse
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Frdric RIEHL, Service des Affaires internationales, Office fdral de la communication, Dpartement fdral de l’environnement, des transports, de l’nergie et de la communication, rue de Bienne
Mr Thomas SCHNEIDER, Service des Affaires internationales, Office fdral de la communication, Dpartement fdral de l’environnement, des transports, de l’nergie et de la communication, rue de Bienne
Mr Pierre SMOLIK, Service des Affaires internationales, Office fdral de la communication, Dpartement fdral de l’environnement, des transports, de l’nergie et de la communication, rue de Bienne

"The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia"/"L'ex-Rpublique Yougoslave de Macdoine"
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Ms Vesna POPOSKA, Head of International PR Department, Government of the Republic of Macedonia

Turkey/Turquie
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Mehmet Bora SNMEZ, International Relations Department, Radio and Television Supreme Council, Ankara

Ukraine
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Viktor NIKITIUK, Ambassador at Large, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine, Kiev

United Kingdom/Royaume-Uni
(Apologised / Excus)

PARTICIPANTS / PARTICIPANTS

Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe/Assemble Parliamentaire du Conseil de l’Europe (PACE/APCE)
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Rdiger DOSSOW, Sub-Committee on the Media, Committee on Culture, Science and Education

Conference of International Non-Governmental Organisations of the Council of Europe / Confrence des organisations internationales non gouvernementales du Conseil de l'Europe
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Gabriel NISSIM, Confrence des OING du Conseil de l’Europe, Strasbourg

European Audiovisual Observatory / Observatoire Europeen de l’audiovisuel
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Ms Suzanne NIKOLTCHEV
Mr. Wolfgang CLOSS

OTHER PARTICIPANTS

Hearing on jurisdiction shopping (18 Nov)
(Confirmed/Confirm)
M. Nicolas NORD

Mr Roland BLESS

Mr Tyge TRIER

Mr Peter NOORLANDER, Media Legal Defence Initiative

Ms Barbora BUKOVSKA, Article 19*

Chair of Ad Hoc Advisory Group on Public Service Media
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Tim SUTER, Managing Director, Perspectives, London

Chair of Ad Hoc Advisory Group on Cross-border Internet
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Wolfgang KLEINWAECHTER, International Association for Media and Communication Research

European Commission/Commission europenne
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Dr Philipp RUNGE, Policdy Adviser, Audiovisual and Media Policies Unit, European Commission, Directorate General for Information Society and Media, Brussels

Holy See / Saint Sige
(Apologised / Excus)

OBSERVERS/OBSERVATEURS

Article 19
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mrs Barbora BUKOVSKA (17-18 November only)*

Association of Commercial Television in Europe, Association des Tlvisions Commerciales europennes (ACT)
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Maxim HAUK LL.M., Legal Adviser, Association of Commercial Television in Europe, Association des Tlvisions Commerciales europennes

Association of European Journalists (AEJ) / Media Freedom Representative
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr William HORSLEY, London

Community Media for Europe (CFME)
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Ciaran MURRAY, Board member

European Newspaper Publishers’ Association (ENPA)
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Holger ROSENDAL, Chefjurist/Head of Legal Department, Danske Dagblades Forening/Danish Newspaper Publishers' Association, Copenhagen

European Federation of Journalist (EFJ)
(Confirmed/Confirm) (16-17 only)
Marc GRUBER, European Co-Director, European Federation of Journalists, Brussels

European Broadcasting Union / Union Europenne de Radio-Tlvision (EBU)
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Michael WAGNER, Deputy Director, Legal and Public Affairs

EuroISPA
(Confirmed/Confirm)
Mr Michael ROTERT

INTERPRETERES / INTEPRETES

Ms Amanda BEDDOWS-LARIVIERE
Mr Luke TILDEN
Ms Shhrazade HOYER
Ms Nadine KIEFFER

SECRETARIAT

Mr Jan MALINOWSKI, Head of Media and Information Society Division, Secretary of the CDMC, Directorate General of Human Rights and Legal Affairs

Mrs Anita van de KAR BACHELET, Admnistrator, Media and Information Society Division Directorate General of Human Rights and Legal Affairs

Ms Anne BOYER-DONNARD, Principal Administrative Assistant, Media and Information Society Division, Directorate General of Human Rights and Legal

Mr Lee HIBBARD, Admnistrator, Task Force for the Internet Governance and Information Society, Directorate General of Human Rights and Legal Affairs

Ms Marise BOYLAN, Assistant, Media and Information Society Division, Directorate General of Human Rights and Legal Affairs

Ms Julia WHITHAM, Assistant, Media and Information Society Division, Directorate General of Human Rights and Legal Affairs

1 Recommendation of the Committee of Ministers to member states on promoting freedom of expression and information in the new information and communications environment (CM/Rec(2007)11), Recommendation of the Committee of Ministers to member states on measures to promote the respect for freedom of expression and information with regard to Internet filters (CM/Rec(2008)6), etc.

2 Recommendation of the Committee of Ministers CM/Rec(2007)16 to member states on measures to promote public service value of the Internet

3 The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) and the European Dialogue of Internet Governance (EuroDIG) two multi-stakeholder dialogue platforms play an important role in shaping common views on Internet governance policies. ICANN's multi-stakeholder structural set-up is also merits consideration. The Internet governance processes, which are examples of organisational innovation and mutual adaptation between society and technology around the world, facilitate the development and application of shared principles, norms, rules, decision-making procedures and programmes that shape the evolution and use of the Internet by governments, the private sector and civil society in their respective roles.

4 Declaration of the Committee of Ministers on the management of the Internet protocol address resources in the public interest (2010), Declaration of the Committee of Ministers on enhanced participation of member states in Internet governance matters – Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC) of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (2010)