Reports

These technical reports do not necessarily reflect official positions of the Council of Europe, of project donors or of the Parties of treaties referred to.

Training on cybercrime

Given the reliance of societies worldwide on information and communication technologies, particular efforts are required to enable law enforcement authorities, judges and prosecutors to investigate, prosecute and adjudicate cybercrime and to make use of electronic evidence through training, networking and specialisation.

To access all the training materials on cybercrime and electronic evidence developed by the Council of Europe within its capacity building programmes, you are invited to join the Octopus Cybercrime Community.

Contact points

Countries, when becoming parties to the Convention on Cybercrime, need to indicate central authorities for extradition (article 24) and for mutual assistance requests (article 27), as well as 24/7 points of contact (article 35).

Contact details can be made available upon request. Please contact Alexander SEGER for further information.

Protection children

Fostering children’s trust and confidence in the Internet coupled with the protection of their dignity, security and privacy is a priority for the Council of Europe. The Internet is a space of freedom to express and communicate, to search for information and to learn, to work and to play. Access to the Internet thus offers great potential for children to exercise and enjoy their rights and values through the Internet.

Preventing Cybercrime

Meeting the challenge of cybercrime requires comprehensive efforts. Criminal justice is an important element of the response. Staying safe online and preventing crime from happening is even better. Here are links to some initiatives by different organisations.Meeting the challenge of cybercrime requires comprehensive efforts.

Criminal justice is an important element of the response. Staying safe online and preventing crime from happening is even better. Here are links to some initiatives by different organisations.

Legal profile

The country profiles have been prepared within the framework of the Council of Europe’s capacity building projects on cybercrime in view of sharing information and assessing the current state of implementation of the Convention on Cybercrime under domestic legislation. They do not necessarily reflect official positions of the country covered or of the Council of Europe.

International cooperation

Cybercrime is very much transnational crime. Attacks launched by a person in one country or jurisdiction can affect persons in multiple other countries, and even an email communication sent to a person in the same country may generate electronic evidence elsewhere as data may be transmitted through servers in several countries.

At the same time electronic evidence is volatile. Thus urgent measures that are needed to preserve data at the national level are also necessary within the framework of international co-operation.

LEA/ISP cooperation

Both law enforcement and Internet service providers play a crucial role in building trust in information and communication technologies (ICT) and helping societies around the world make best use of these technologies.

Octopus Community

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Alexander Seger
Cybercrime Division
Agora Building
F-67075 Strasbourg Cedex