The Intercultural city aims at building its policies and identity on the explicit acknowledgement that diversity can be a resource for the development of the society.

The first step is the adoption (and implementation) of strategies that facilitate positive intercultural encounters and exchanges, and promote equal and active participation of residents and communities in the development of the city, thus responding to the needs of a diverse population. The Intercultural integration policy model is based on extensive research evidence, on a range of international legal instruments, and on the collective input of the cities member of the Intercultural Cities programme that share their good practice examples on how to better manage diversity, address possible conflicts, and benefit from the diversity advantage.

This section offers examples of intercultural approaches that facilitate the development and implementation of intercultural strategies.

Template for collection of Good practices >>


To get acquainted with cities’ good practices related to the management of the Covid-19 pandemic, please visit Intercultural Cities: COVID-19 Special page.

Back

Multilingualism as a two ways policy

2020
  • Diminuer la taille du texte
  • Augmenter la taille du texte
  • Imprimer la page
  • Imprimer en PDF

Montreal places particular emphasis on the inclusion of children from visible and ethnic minorities in schools.  The city also has a three-year budget of C$500 000 for developing initiatives to promote the French language (“Francisation”) following consultation with local players, in particular in priority inclusion zones.  The city also provides financial support for private/public sector institutions providing training in migrant/minority languages.

The programmes of the Accès culture network described above are also geared towards helping newcomers acquire the necessary language skills.  In addition, a programme called “J’apprends le français” (I’m learning French) run by the Chamber of Commerce of Metropolitan Montreal is an innovative language project involving pairing between shopkeepers and students designed to improve the language skills of small business owners and staff right in their workplaces.

Again in the area of teaching the local language, under a project called “Liaison agents” run by borough libraries in co-operation with community organisations, schools (reception classes, French for adults) and the health sector, various mediation activities are conducted in order to help non-native speaker newcomers or people with migration backgrounds to learn French.  At the same time, the libraries are currently working on a research project on multilingual albums that should enable children to learn French more easily while boosting their skills in their mother tongues.

Montreal History Centre also carries out programmes to promote the use of French and has catered here for migrant groups and reception class pupils since 1992.

Libraries provide online access to hundreds of magazines and newspapers from all over the world in the original languages.


Filter by Filter by
Topic
Anti-discrimination and Equality
Anti-rumour
Business and Employment
Communication and public awareness
Culture, Leisure and Heritage
Developing a culture of openness and Interculturality
Education
Gender equality and Intersectionality
Health, Social care and Family support
Housing and urban planning
International outlook
Leadership and Political Commitment
Mediation and conflict resolution
Multilingualism
Neighbourhood
Political and public participation
Public and Community Services
Refugees
Religion and Interfaith
Roma
Security, Justice and Safety
Welcoming and social integration
Countries
Australia
Austria
Canada
Croatia
Cyprus
Denmark
France
Germany
Greece
Iceland
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Japan
Luxembourg
Mexico
Netherlands
New Zealand
Norway
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Serbia
South Korea
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Ukraine
United Kingdom
Year
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
Reset Filter