North-South Centre - European Centre for Global Interdependence and Solidarity

WORLD AWARE EDUCATION AWARDS

Recognising excellence in partnership, networking and coordination
for increased and improved global education

with the kind support of

WORLD AWARE EDUCATION AWARDS

APPLICATION FORM

1. NAME OF THE PROJECT

Eagle’s Kingdom – global biodiversity game

2. BRIEF SUMMARY DESCRIPTION

A peer-led simulation game based on a board with 4 local habitats – loch, peat bog, forest and river estuary/village

3. WHAT IS THE NORTH-SOUTH/ GLOBAL DIMENSION OF YOUR PROJECT? Please describe

The aim of the game is to show young people the complexity of the decision making process in their local surroundings and to bring in a global perspective to all issues raised eg

    Hydro electric dam construction
    Electrical energy - a right for all?
    The power of multinational companies eg supermarkets
    Global significance of destruction of forests

4. PARTNER ORGANISATIONS

    a) LEAD PARTNER

    Name: Highland One World Group
    Contact details Education Centre Castle Street Dingwall IV15 9HU Scotland
    01381 621265 janis.keast@highland.gov.uk
    Type of Organisation Development Education Centre

    b) PARTNER 2

    Name: Nature Workshop
    Contact details Aspen House Rhiandoggie Rogart Sutherland IV28 3XG Scotland
    Type of Organisation Educational Charity

    c) OTHER PARTNERS CSV Action for Sustainability, Scottish Natural Heritage
    (SNH), Department for International Development (DFID) and
    Enterprise in Education through Business Links (EEBL)

WORLD AWARE EDUCATION AWARDS

5. PLEASE OUTLINE BRIEFLY THE FOLLOWING ELEMENTS
OF THE PROJECT1:

    a) overall aims

      In an interactive way help young people to discover the links between their own lives and others and to see the injustice that particularly impacts on the poor, locally and globally

    b) specific objectives

      to create a game by working with a class so that it’s an example of peer education, young people speaking to other young people
      to trial and test the game with other schools
      to promote it to teachers and Countryside Rangers
      to ensure its sustainability by leaving copies of it with the Ranger Service for future use.

      The game promotes
      critical and creative thinking
      cooperative learning
      problem solving and the complexity of decision making, to see that solutions can create more problems

      The game encourages joined-up learning, to see the links between sustainable living, health, energy efficiency, enterprise and that everything has a global connection / impact. We do live in an interdependent world

      The class involved in the development wanted it to be fun, as they felt young people learn better this way.

    c) outcomes

      The game has been made, adapted and refined with a facilitator’s guide. It has had very positive feedback- teachers like the methodology and the positive impact on behaviour. Several have commented how well certain individuals in their classes have responded to it. ‘He was really involved’. ‘I have never seen my class work so cooperatively’. Young people like the content. ‘We are really being political, aren’t we?’ ‘We are either all winners or all losers depending on what we decide’. ‘We could have achieved more if we’d shared our resources’. ‘It is so inclusive. There is something for everyone’.

    d) duration of the project

      3 years

    e) participation of the target group(s)

    in the design of the project

      The content is owned by the class whose ideas it is. The head teacher involved was complimented in her HMIe report for being involved in this project which to her did so much to contribute to the 4 capacities of a Curriculum for Excellence: Effective Contributors, Successful Learners, Confident Individuals and Responsible Citizens.

    in the implementation of the project

      The class helped deliver the first sessions with other schools to ensure that the ethos they wanted was enshrined in the supporting booklets that evolved. Distance and time made it more difficult to include the young people after that especially as some moved on to different secondary schools. As a group they did do a presentation to Highland Council in the council chamber and they led the way when the game was launched before an audience including MSPs, Education Authority representatives and parents.

    f) strategies for integrating learning from the project into the educational system (formal and non-formal).

      Local Authority Quality Improvement officers are aware of the game and its teaching methods. This has lead to its inclusion in CPD offered. A lot of work has been done with it with Probationary teachers especially who were very taken with the discussion and passion the game arouses. They could see many ways these techniques would be sued in their classroom with or without the game.

    g) evaluation mechanisms (internal and/or external).

      All sessions with classes and teachers are evaluated. Qualitative assessment is sought

    h) budget – details of financial sources and summary of income and expenditure.

    Please see attached document for details of finances. Scottish Natural Heritage funded the development of the game and then with DFID supported the rolling out of the game and the reproduction of it. Enterprise in Education through Business Links allowed a teacher to work with us on its development and another to collaborate on the support materials.

    6. DESCRIBE HOW NETWORKING, PARTNERSHIP OR CO-ORDINATION WORKS IN THE PROJECT TO ENHANCE EFFECTIVENESS

This project has achieved so much through successful partnership working. Action for Sustainability, Highland One World Group and Nature Workshop supported and complemented each other. SNH were very supportive and EEBL allowed two teachers to make it a real team effort after the initial developmental stage.

7. WHAT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT LEARNING DIMENSION OF THE PROJECT THAT COULD BE USEFUL IN OTHER COUNTRIES?

Trust young people’s ideas. They know what their peers like. They rose to the challenge in the creation of the game. ‘We knew we could do it’, they said. Cooperative problem solving enables all to participate. It gives a voice to those who are sometimes sidelined in the class.
This project turned local concerns into global awareness - that others are experiencing similar situations and it empowered young people to be more active in their community.


1 Please feel free to use existing documentation in response to Part 5 of the application form.