The Intercultural city aims at building its policies and identity on the explicit acknowledgement that diversity can be a resource for the development of the society.

The first step is the adoption (and implementation) of strategies that facilitate positive intercultural encounters and exchanges, and promote equal and active participation of residents and communities in the development of the city, thus responding to the needs of a diverse population. The Intercultural integration policy model is based on extensive research evidence, on a range of international legal instruments, and on the collective input of the cities member of the Intercultural Cities programme that share their good practice examples on how to better manage diversity, address possible conflicts, and benefit from the diversity advantage.

This section offers examples of intercultural approaches that facilitate the development and implementation of intercultural strategies.

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To get acquainted with cities’ good practices related to the management of the Covid-19 pandemic, please visit Intercultural Cities: COVID-19 Special page.

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Understanding citizens’ intercultural awareness

2020
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For several years, Montreal has collected statistical data that are used to paint a sociodemographic picture of the migrants recorded in its territory. The data are obtained from the population censuses conducted on a five-yearly basis by Statistics Canada and can be used, among other things, to monitor the trends in each community and hence distinguish population groups which are declining from those which are growing from year to year. The data also provide vital information for analysing and understanding the main socioeconomic characteristics of migrants by comparing them with non-migrants, in particular concerning issues relating to schooling, labour market integration and the gap between the earnings of migrants and non-migrants. The analyses produced on the basis of these data are published on the city of Montreal’s website and feed into the city administration’s discussions in connection with the development of several policies and programmes covering specific population groups.

Key examples here include:

- The 2018-2022 Economic Development Strategy, which provides for practical measures to promote the economic integration of migrants, with one of the key objectives being to increase their employment rate;

- The Entrepreneurship Action Plan, under which Montreal’s Economic Development Department undertakes, firstly, to support initiatives designed to help migrants and raise their awareness of entrepreneurship and, secondly, to conduct activities to attract and support entrepreneurs with migration backgrounds;

- The aforementioned Inclusive Montreal Action Plan, the aims of which include the vocational integration of migrants in employment that matches their skills;

- The future Social Development Action Plan for 2019-2020, which makes provision for the use of decision-making tools employing evidence-based data relating to diversity and social inclusion.

In addition to the statistical data, in November 2017 the city launched a major survey in order to determine Montrealers’ views of migration and enable it to target the obstacles to migrants’ labour market integration. The results of the survey were published (in French);

For its part, the BINAM has launched a project called ECHO, involving a major quantitative and qualitative street poll of migrants, newcomers, asylum seekers and refugees to determine their needs, their migration histories and their levels of satisfaction regarding the services they receive. ECHO is a vital monitoring tool for observing and understanding the trends in certain indicators. It is a barometer that uses a mixed methodology combining quantitative and qualitative approaches as a means of ensuring that the measures taken remain in line with the needs of newcomers to Montreal. The poll is conducted every two years.

In 2014, the Police Department also conducted a poll on public perceptions of safety and security and related issues in their neighbourhoods. By responding to the short survey (online and by telephone), citizens played a part in drawing up an action plan and helped to prioritise police action.

Lastly, the city runs training courses to develop the intercultural skills of its managers, recruitment staff and staff as a whole. These involve modules which vary according to the participants’ job profiles and may cover intercultural communication in the workplace, reasonable accommodation and motivating diverse teams. The latter is an innovative module developed for the city by the Quebec National School of Public Administration (ENAP) and involves two days of training and two co-development activities. A one-day training course on communication and professional collaboration in diverse workplaces is mandatory for staff taking part in the work sponsorship programme.


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