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CRI (2004) 36

Annual report on ECRI’S activities covering the period from 1 January to 31 December 2003

Strasbourg, 8 June 2004

Annual report 2003 - Download the document

CONTENTS

Preface
Main trends
ECRI’s Activities in 2003

APPENDIX I -Membership of the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance (31 December 2003)
APPENDIX II - Secretariat of the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance
APPENDIX III - Meetings held by ECRI in 2003
APPENDIX IV- List of publications

Preface 

The European Commission against Racism and Intolerance (ECRI) is a mechanism which was established by the first Summit of Heads of State and Government of the Council of Europe member States. The decision to establish ECRI is contained in the Vienna Declaration adopted by the first Summit on 9 October 1993.

ECRI’s task is to combat racism, xenophobia, antisemitism and intolerance at the level of greater Europe and from the perspective of the protection of human rights. ECRI’s action covers all necessary measures to combat violence, discrimination and prejudice faced by persons or groups of persons, on grounds of “race”, colour, language, religion, nationality or national or ethnic origin.

ECRI's members are appointed on the basis of their in-depth knowledge in the field of combating intolerance. They should have high moral authority and recognised expertise in dealing with racism, xenophobia, antisemitism and intolerance. They serve in their individual capacity, are independent and impartial in fulfilling their mandate, and do not receive any instructions from their government.

ECRI’s programme of activities comprises three aspects: the country-by-country approach; work on general themes; and relations with civil society. ECRI’s strategy for constantly enhancing its activities is to take a step-by-step approach, building on the work it has already accomplished by evaluating, consolidating and extending its action.

The Political Declaration and the General Conclusions of the European Conference against Racism (Strasbourg, 11-13 October 2000) both called for the strengthening of the action of ECRI. On 13 June 2002, the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe adopted a new Statute for ECRI, thereby consolidating its role as an independent human rights monitoring mechanism specialised in questions relating to racism and intolerance.

Main trends 

1. Each year, as an introduction to its Annual Report, ECRI outlines, in the light of the data compiled in the course of its various activities, some of the main trends reflecting the context in which it will need to continue its efforts and step up its action in the future. The precise characteristics and extent of these trends vary from region to region and from country to country. They are however sufficiently widespread to justify special mention.

2. ECRI, as a moral authority in the fight against racism in Europe, supports and promotes the principle that national legislations should offer sufficient protection against all contemporary forms of racism and racial discrimination. Today, these phenomena are based on a wide range of grounds, and in reality, it is often impossible to separate these grounds one from an-other.

3. In its General Policy Recommendation N° 7 on national legislation to combat racism and racial discrimination, ECRI calls for legal protection to be provided against racist acts and discrimination on the grounds of “race”, colour, language, religion, nationality or national or ethnic origin. The inclusion of such a list of prohibited grounds of racism and racial discrimination is based on the experience developed by ECRI in the context of its analysis of manifestations of racism in the various member States of the Council of Europe.

4. ECRI deplores the increase in the dissemination of antisemitic ideas and in acts of violence perpetrated against members of Jewish communities and their institutions. These phenomena closely followed con-temporary world developments, and ECRI recalls that combating antisemitism is integral and intrinsic to opposing all forms of racism.

5. Prejudices against Muslim communities continue, both within society in general and within certain public institutions. A climate of hostility leads to discriminations against persons who are or who are believed to be Muslim and to negative attitudes towards them.

6. Manifestations of xenophobia, discrimination and racist acts against migrants, refugees and asylum seekers are an issue of concern. Immigration is the subject of ongoing debate in Council of Europe member States, and ECRI is concerned about the racist and xenophobic tone that the debate is taking in some cases.

7. Roma/Gypsies are a target for racism throughout Europe, to the extent that they do not, in our society, enjoy equal rights, which is however, a fundamental human right. Most members of Roma/Gypsy communities are victims of numerous and varied human right violations.

8. The audience given to political parties which spread a xenophobic ideology is a matter of concern to ECRI. Racist and xenophobic discourse includes openly racist material and statements, but also propaganda that typically target minority groups. ECRI is concerned by the influence that such parties exercise on mainstream political parties, and calls on all political parties to espouse the principles contained in the Charter of European political parties for a non-racist society.

9. ECRI notes with concern that, as a result of the fight against terrorism engaged since the events of 11 September 2001, certain groups of persons have become particularly vulnerable to racism and racial discrimination. ECRI is convinced that terrorism and terrorist activities, irrespective of their origin, are incompatible with and threaten the values, principles and ideals of liberty, democracy, justice and human rights. At the same time, the response to the threat of terrorism should not itself encroach upon the very values and principles that democratic societies aim to safeguard. Terrorism should be combated, but it should not become a pretext under which discrimination and intolerance are allowed to flourish.

10. The negative trends outlined above should be closely monitored and additional measures taken at local, national and European level to combat manifestations of racism, xenophobia, antisemitism and intolerance.

11. ECRI draws attention to these trends since, as a Commission with the task of combating racism, it has the duty to describe the forms which racism takes today. ECRI wishes nevertheless to stress that not all the trends are negative, and that there are also some encouraging signs, at international, European and national level, which indicate that member States and civil society are determined to combat racism and intolerance.

12. ECRI welcomes substantial progress made in a progressive manner in the fight against racism and racial discrimination in Europe.

13. The essential precondition for combating racism and racial discrimination effectively is acknowledging that the problems exist. Not least thanks to ECRI, it is clearer today at pan-European level that racism and racial discrimination occur everywhere, not only in their most extreme and most serious forms, but also in everyday life throughout Europe, and present major and sometimes even insurmountable obstacles in the daily lives of many individuals.

14. Legislation is a strong tool for combating racism. The adoption of Protocol N° 12 to the European Convention on Human Rights, which provides a general prohibition of discrimination, is an important step forward. To date, 28 States have signed it, and 5 States have ratified it. ECRI strongly hopes that Protocol N° 12 will be rapidly signed and ratified by all member States of the Council of Europe.

15. ECRI welcomes the fact that most member States are in the process of revising their anti-discrimination legislation and that new provisions have been introduced at the national level to combat racism and racial discrimination. ECRI hopes in this context that its General Policy Recommendation N° 7 will be widely-used by all interested parties, and will serve as a source of inspiration for legislative reforms in this field.

16. Nevertheless, if these provisions are to be fully effective, it is essential that the authorities, in particular the police and the courts, implement them. They should on no account remain a dead letter, which means it is necessary not only to inform the public and potential victims, but also to provide training to relevant staff. This is why ECRI stresses the need to establish a national specialised body, with local branches, to combat racism and racial discrimination.

17. ECRI’s new Statute entered into force in 2003. It consolidated the role of ECRI as an independent human rights monitoring body specialised on issues related to racism, xenophobia, antisemitism and in-tolerance. This Statute also guarantees the principle of independence and impartiality of members of ECRI.

18. ECRI will celebrate its tenth anniversary on 18 March 2004. ECRI’s very existence reflects the clear political will of the Council of Europe member States to take practical measures together against racism, xenophobia, antisemitism and intolerance in Europe. But ECRI knows however that the true measure of the effectiveness of all the work done over the last ten years and that still to come will be whether or not there are real changes in the lives of the victims of racism.

ECRI’s Activities in 2003 

1. Country-by-country approach

1. The first aspect of ECRI’s activities concerns its country-by-country approach. This is a method whereby ECRI closely examines the situation in each of the member States of the Council of Europe and draws up, following this analysis, suggestions and proposals as to how the problems of racism and intolerance identified in each country might be overcome. The aim of this exercise is to formulate helpful and well-founded proposals which may assist governments in taking practical and precise steps to counter racism and intolerance.

2. ECRI’s reports are first transmitted in the form of draft texts to the member States concerned for a brief process of confidential dialogue with the national authorities of these countries. The content of the report is reviewed in the light of this dialogue. The report is then adopted in its final form and transmitted by ECRI to the government of the member State concerned, through the intermediary of the Council of Europe’s Committee of Ministers.

3. ECRI’s country-by-country approach concerns all Council of Europe member States on an equal footing. The reports for the first cycle were completed in late 1998. From January 1999 to the end of December 2002, ECRI worked on the second round of its country-by-country approach. ECRI started in January 2003 the third round of its country-by-country approach.

4. In order to obtain as detailed and comprehensive a picture as possible of the situation concerning racism and intolerance in the countries in question, a contact visit is organised before the preparation of each new country report.

5. The visits provide an opportunity for the rapporteurs to meet officials from the various ministries and national public authorities dealing with issues within ECRI’s remit. They also allow the rapporteurs to meet representatives of NGOs working in the field, as well as some of ECRI’s other partners and anyone else concerned with matters within ECRI’s remit.

6. In 2003, ECRI published its last twelve second round country-specific reports: ECRI’s second reports on Andorra, Azerbaijan, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Moldova and Sweden were published on 15 April 2003; the second reports on Armenia, Iceland, Luxembourg, Slovenia and Spain were published on 8 July 2003 and the report on San Marino on 4 November 2003.

7. The publication of ECRI’s country-by-country reports is an important stage in the development of an ongoing, active dialogue between ECRI and the authorities of member States with a view to identifying solutions to the problems of racism and intolerance with which the latter are confronted. The input of Non-Governmental Organisations and other bodies or individuals active in this field is a welcome part of this process, and should ensure that ECRI’s contribution is as constructive and useful as possible.

8. ECRI attaches considerable importance to this dialogue with government authorities and non-governmental bodies as a means of following up the suggestions made in its country-by-country reports. Adequate dissemination of the results of its work in the member States is part of its strategy in this connection.

9. The twelve reports published in 2003 have all been translated into the national language(s) of the country concerned, and national NGOs have been encouraged to organise an event in the country concerned upon publication of the report as a means of raising aware-ness of its content. Steps have been taken to ensure that the report is circulated as widely as possible among relevant bodies at national level. A “dissemination plan” has been drawn up in conjunction with the relevant national member of ECRI.

10. As far as media coverage is concerned, a press release has systematically been issued and widely distributed each time a report is published. Most of these press releases have served as a basis for articles in the press and radio broadcasts.

11. In 2003, ECRI also carried out nine contact visits and drafted nine new reports on the following countries: Germany, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Greece, Hungary, Norway, Slovakia and Switzerland.

12. The third round reports focus on “implementation”. They examine if ECRI’s main recommendations from previous reports have been implemented and if so, with what degree of success. The third round reports also deal with “specific issues”, chosen according to the different situations in each country, and examined in more depth in each report.

2. Work on general themes

13. The second aspect of ECRI’s programme includes work on general themes and activities specifically based on these themes, with a view to making a real contribution to the setting up and strengthening of those institutions which underpin the functioning of civil society.

General policy recommendations

14. ECRI’s General Policy Recommendations are addressed to the governments of all member States and cover main important areas of current concern in the fight against racism and intolerance. They are intended to serve as guidelines that policy-makers are invited to use when drawing up national strategies and policies to combat racism and intolerance.

15. On 17 February 2003, ECRI released its General Policy Recommendation N° 7 on national legislation to combat racism and racial discrimination (adopted on 13 December 2002).

16. The General Policy Recommendation N° 7 contains the key elements of a comprehensive national legislation to effectively combat racism and racial discrimination. The scope of the Recommendation is very wide. It not only addresses direct and indirect discrimination, also other legal aspects of the fight against racism, including racist expressions, racist organisations and racially-motivated offences.

17. The Recommendation covers all branches of the law, i.e. constitutional, criminal, civil and administrative law. ECRI believes that only such an integrated approach will enable member States to address these problems in a manner which is as exhaustive, effective and satisfactory from the point of view of the victim as possible.

18. In preparing its Recommendation, ECRI took into account national legislation and existing international standards. However, in some aspects, the Recommendation goes further than the latter. Among the most significant additions are: the inclusion of nationality, religion and language among the grounds for which discrimination is prohibited; the application of the prohibition of discrimination to a very broad range of areas, including the activities of the police and border control officials; the attribution of more extensive powers to national specialised bodies to combat racism and racial discrimination; the establishment of a positive duty on public authorities to promote equality and to prevent discrimination in carrying out their functions.

19. In addition to the English and French versions, the Recommendation was translated into seven other national languages (German, Bulgarian, Spanish, Greek, Latvian, Romanian and Russian). It was sent to 2000 selected governmental and non-governmental recipients likely to put it to practical use in their work at national level. Several references to ECRI’s General Policy Recommendation N° 7 were made at meetings and conferences dealing with the issue of combating racism and racial discrimination. The text of the Recommendation was directly used in legislative reforms in a number of member States and had a positive influence on the content of anti-discriminatory legislation in preparation.

20. In 2003, ECRI also conducted work on its General Policy Recommendation N° 8 on combating racism while fighting terrorism (adoption foreseen in March 2004), which focuses on how to ensure that the fight against terrorism does not infringe upon the rights of persons to be free from racism and racial discrimination. This General Policy Recommendation is part of the more general efforts underway in the Council of Europe to ensure respect for human rights while fighting against terrorism.

21. ECRI’s next General Policy Recommendation N° 9 (adoption foreseen in June 2004) is devoted to the fight against antisemitism.

Relations with other Council of Europe bodies

22. ECRI is kept regularly informed of the work of other Council of Europe bodies dealing with issues related to racism and intolerance. Its Secretariat regularly provides information on ECRI’s work to these bodies. In 2003, ECRI co-operated in particular with the Commissioner for Human Rights, the Advisory Committee of the Frame-work Convention for the Protection of National Minorities, and the Group of Specialists on Roma/Gypsies (MG-S-ROM). The Parliamentary Assembly and the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe are represented within ECRI and actively con-tribute to its work.

3. Relations with civil society

23. A successful strategy against racism and intolerance depends to a large extent in raising awareness of the threat posed by these phenomena and ensuring that the anti-racist message filters down throughout civil society in general. ECRI attaches increasing importance to this third aspect of its programme of activities and accordingly adopted on 20 March 2002 a programme of action for reinforcing its relations with civil society.

24. This programme falls within the framework of the global approach of the Council of Europe to promote tolerance. It is complementary to actions implemented in fields such as education and culture, as well as human rights awareness-raising. It also constitutes the basis for ECRI’s contribution to the implementation of the Conclusions of the European and World Conferences against racism, which stressed the importance of involving civil society in the fight against racism and intolerance.

Organisation of national Round Tables in member States

25. ECRI’s Round Table in Portugal was held in Lisbon on 26 February 2003. It discussed ECRI’s second report on Portugal; challenges ahead for Portugal in the field of asylum and immigration; anti-discrimination legislation; and the situation of Roma/Gypsies in Portugal.

26. ECRI’s Round Table in Lithuania was held in Vilnius on 12 June 2003. It discussed ECRI’s second report on Lithuania; challenges facing Lithuania in the field of immigration and asylum; anti-discrimination legislation; and the situation of Roma/Gypsies in Lithuania.

27. ECRI’s Round Table in Slovenia was held in Ljubljana on 14 October 2003. It discussed ECRI’s second report on Slovenia; anti-discrimination legislation; ex-Yugoslav minority groups in Slovenia; and racism and xenophobia in public discourse.

28. ECRI’s Round Tables contributed in a positive way to the debates on combating racism and intolerance and encouraged reflection in the relevant governmental and non-governmental circles. These events also raised awareness among the general public about problems related to racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, antisemitism and intolerance.

Seminar with national specialised bodies to combat racism and racial discrimination

29. At a time when many member States of the Council of Europe are engaged in the process of reviewing their anti-discrimination legislation and considering the establishment or reinforcement of national specialised bodies to combat racism and racial discrimination (specialised bodies), ECRI organised a two-day seminar on these topics which was held in Strasbourg on 13 and 14 November 2003.

30. The aim of the seminar was to assist member States in their efforts at reform in this field and provide key actors in this process with a forum for exchange and discussion as to how best to implement legislation to combat racism and racial discrimination.

31. The Seminar brought together representatives of national specialised bodies to combat racism and racial discrimination, representatives of general human rights institutions (Ombudsman, Human Rights Commissioner etc.) whose mandate already covers or will be ex-tended to cover racism and racial discrimination, and representatives of ministries who are or will be responsible for the setting up of such a national specialised body. All participants actively participated in discussions by commenting on interventions and providing examples of the situation in their own country.

Development of a communication strategy

32. On the basis of the strategy set out by ECRI’s communication “think tank”, different initiatives have been implemented in 2003.

33. Press releases were drafted and distributed to coincide with the publication of ECRI’s country-by-country re-ports. A Listserv was set up to inform ECRI’s main partners of the latest developments in its activities. Country-specific lists of national journalists particularly interested in ECRI’s activities have been drawn up. A publication reviewing ECRI’s activities (including an assessment of their impact) has been finalised and will be published on 18 March 2004 to coincide with ECRI’s tenth anniversary.

34. In 2003 the ECRI Secretariat identified 133 articles concerning ECRI and the results of its activities in the national media. The Secretariat has prepared press reviews containing these articles, which come to a total of 300 pages (published three times a year: 45 pages in March 2003; 100 pages in June 2003 and 147 pages in December 2003).

Co-operation with the European Monitoring Centre on Racism and Xenophobia

35. ECRI and the EUMC organised their first joint round table in Strasbourg on 21 March 2003, on the occasion of the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.

36. This one-day event entitled “Local Solutions to Combat Racism”, aimed to contribute in a positive way to the debates on problems related to racism, racial discrimination and intolerance at the local, national and European level and at the same time to further strengthen the fruitful co-operation between ECRI and the EUMC. The objective of the Round Table was to examine the conditions for minimising points of potential conflict between different groups in a given community - with an emphasis on practical initiatives. The chosen title “Local Solutions to Combat Racism” acknowledges the fact that problems related to racism and xenophobia are best dealt with at the local level – as close to potential victims of discrimination as possible – where members of minority groups face discrimination on a daily basis.

37. Furthermore, on the basis of the Agreement signed on 10 February 1997 between the European Community and the Council of Europe for the purposes of establishing close co-operation between the EUMC and ECRI, regular contacts were maintained in 2003 between the two bodies.

APPENDIX I -Membership of the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance (31 December 2003) 

Name

Member in respect of

Term of office expires

Professor Levan ALEXIDZE

Georgia

1st January 2008

Professor Raluca BESTELIU

Romania

1st January 2008

Dr Ena CREMONA

Malta

22nd January 2008

Mr Vitaliano ESPOSITO

Italy

1st January 2008

Mr Gilberto FELICI

San Marino

12 June 2008

Mr Fernando FERNÁNDEZ SAVATER

Spain

22nd January 2008

Mr Fernando FERREIRA RAMOS

Portugal

1st January 2008

Mr Chris FLOOD

Ireland

1st January 2008

Mr Ljubomir D. FRCKOSKI

“The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia”

1st January 2008

Professor Lauri HANNIKAINEN

Finland

1st January 2008

Mr Michael HEAD

the United Kingdom

1st January 2008

Professor Gudrun HOLGERSEN

Norway

1st January 2008

Mr Lätif H. HÜSEYNOV

Azerbaijan

1st January 2008

Professor Vasilika HYSI

Albania

1st January 2008

Professor Dalibor JÍLEK

the Czech Republic

1st January 2008

Mr Jenö KALTENBACH

Hungary

1st January 2008

Professor Stefan KARNER

Austria

1st January 2008

Mr Vigen KOCHARYAN

Armenia

1st January 2008

Mr Luben KOULICHEV

Bulgaria

1st January 2008

Ms Adila KRESO

Bosnia and Herzegovina

13th February 2008

Reverend Baldur KRISTJÁNSSON

Iceland

1st January 2008

Professor Gün KUT

Turkey

1st January 2008

Mr Johan LEMAN

Belgium

22nd January 2008

Mr Roger LINSTER

Luxembourg

1st January 2008

Ms Ruta MARJAŠA

Latvia

1st January 2008

Mr Arvydas Virgilijus MATULIONIS

Lithuania

1st January 2008

Mr Mart NUTT

Estonia

1st January 2008

Professor Stelios E. PERRAKIS

Greece

1st January 2008

Professor Tibor PICHLER

Slovakia

1st January 2008

Ms Alenka PUHAR

Slovenia

1st January 2008

Professor Maja SERSIC

Croatia

1st January 2008

Professor Andrzej SICINSKI

Poland

1st January 2008

Professor Eva SMITH ASMUSSEN

Denmark

1st January 2008

Ms Winnie SORGDRAGER

the Netherlands

22nd January 2008

Mr Felix STANEVSKIY

the Russian Federation

1st January 2008

Mr Klaus STOLTENBERG

Germany

1st January 2008

Mr Demetrios STYLIANIDES

Cyprus

1st January 2008

Ms Martine VALDES-BOULOUQUE

France

1st January 2008

Professor Victor VOLCINSCHI

Moldova

1st January 2008

Professor Joseph VOYAME

Switzerland

1st January 2008

Ms Margareta WADSTEIN

Sweden

1st January 2008

Vacant seat

Andorra

 

Vacant seat

Liechtenstein

 

Vacant seat

Serbia and Montenegro

 

Vacant seat

Ukraine

 


Deputies to the members of ECRI (31 December 2003)

Name

Deputy in respect of

Term of office expires

Ms Doris ANGST YILMAZ

Switzerland

1st January 2008

Ms Ylva BRUNE

Sweden

1st January 2008

Mr José Manuel FRESNO GARCIA

Spain

22nd January 2008

Ms Eva HEIZER HEGEDÜS

Hungary

1st January 2008

Professor Aleksandra KORAĆ

Croatia

1st January 2008

Mr Konstantin KORKELIA

Georgia

1st January 2008

Professor Šarūnas LIEKIS

Lithuania

1st January 2008

Professor Erich MISTRIK

Slovakia

1st January 2008

Professor Artis PABRIKS

Latvia

1st January 2008

Ms Merja PENTIKÄINEN

Finland

1st January 2008

Mr François SANT'ANGELO

Belgium

22nd January 2008

Professor Dr Gerald SCHÖPFER

Austria

1st January 2008

Mr Hans-Joachim STANGE

Germany

1st January 2008

Ms Hanna WOŁĄSIEWICZ

Poland

22nd January 2008



Observers in the meetings of ECRI in 2003:

Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe
Mr Kevin Mc NAMARA
Ms Mirjana FERIC-VAČ

Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe
Mr Mohammad NAZIR

Holy See
Professor Jean-Pierre MACHELON

European Commission
Ms Barbara NOLAN

European Monitoring Centre on Racism and Xenophobia
Professor Petros STANGOS

ECRI’S BUREAU (31 December 2003)

Mr Michael HEAD
Chair
member in respect of the United Kingdom

Mr Jenö KALTENBACH
1st Vice-Chair
member in respect of Hungary

Ms Alenka PUHAR
2nd Vice-Chair
member in respect of Slovenia

Mr Roger LINSTER
Bureau member
member in respect of Luxembourg

Ms Winnie SORGDRAGER
Bureau member
member in respect of the Netherlands

Ms Martine VALDES-BOULOUQE
Bureau member
member in respect of France

Ms Margareta WADSTEIN
Bureau member
member in respect of

ECRI’S BUREAU (18 March 2004)

Mr Michael HEAD
Chair
member in respect of the United Kingdom

Ms Winnie SORGDRAGER
1st Vice-Chair
member in respect of the Netherlands

Mr Baldur KRISTJANSSON
2nd Vice-Chair
member in respect of Iceland

Mr Roger LINSTER
Bureau member
member in respect of Luxembourg

Ms Margareta WADSTEIN
Bureau member
member in respect of Sweden

Mr Fernando FERREIRA RAMOS
Bureau member
member in respect of Portugal

Professor Raluca BESTELIU
Bureau member
member in respect of Romania

APPENDIX II - Secretariat of the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance 


Mme Isil GACHET, Directorate General of Human Rights, Executive Secretary to the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance, Conseil de l'Europe, 67075 STRASBOURG CEDEX, France
Tel: +33 (0) 3 88 41 23 48
Fax: +33 (0) 3 88 41 39 87
E-mail: isil.gachet@coe.int

Mme Claudia LAM, Administrator
Tel: +33 (0) 3 88 41 23 49
Fax: +33 (0) 3 88 41 39 87
E-mail: claudia.lam@coe.int

M. Giancarlo CARDINALE, Legal and Policy Researcher
Tel: +33 (0) 3 88 41 39 42
Fax: +33 (0) 3 88 41 39 87
E-mail: giancarlo.cardinale@coe.int

Ms Lanna HOLLO, Legal and Policy Researcher
Tel: +33 (0) 3 90 21 42 16
Fax: +33 (0) 3 88 41 39 87
E-mail: lanna.hollo@coe.int

Ms Heike KLEMPA, Responsible for relations with civil society
Tel: + 33 (0) 3 90 21 51 55
Fax: +33 (0) 3 88 41 39 87
E-mail: heike.klempa@coe.int

Ms Paula ECK-WALTERS, Documentalist
Tel: +33 (0) 3 88 41 33 99
Fax: +33 (0) 3 88 41 39 87
E-mail: paula.eck-walters@coe.int

Mme Sylvia LEHMANN, Assistant
Tel: +33 (0) 3 88 41 29 64
Fax: +33 (0) 3 88 41 39 87
E-mail: sylvia.lehmann@coe.int

Ms Jennifer HOOD, Assistant
Tel: +33 (0) 3 90 21 53 96
Fax: +33 (0) 3 88 41 39 87
E-mail: Jennifer.hood@coe.int

APPENDIX III - Meetings held by ECRI in 2003 

Plenary sessions

Bureau meetings

Meetings of CBC Working Groups

Working group on Immigration and asylum issues
9 July 2003

Meetings of the Working group on the fight against terrorism and combating racism.

Joint meeting of the ECRI Bureau and the Bureau of the European Monitoring Centre on Racism and Xenophobia (EUMC)

Meetings of the Working Group on relations with civil society

Seminar with national specialised bodies to combat racism and racial discrimination

National Round-Tables

APPENDIX IV- List of publications 

First round :

Second round: