www.coe.int/ecri
 

About ECRI

Statute

Other CM Decisions

Internal Rules of Procedure

ECRI members

Activities

Mandate

Country Monitoring Work

Work on General Themes

Statements

Awareness-raising

 

Library

Publications

Search (HUDOC database)

Press Releases

 

 Secretariat

Secretariat

Contact

 

E-news

Subscription

 

Restricted access

Access members

Password reset (expires every two months)

 
 
 
 
 
 


Research conducted for ECRI by the Swiss Institute of Comparative Law

INTRODUCTION

The promotion of tolerance and respect for other people has formed an integral part of the work of the Council of Europe since its foundation in 1949.

The Council of Europe's action in this field was given a new impetus at the first Summit of Heads of State and Government of the member States of the Council of Europe held in Vienna in October 1993.

Alarmed by the resurgence of the phenomena of racism, xenophobia and antisemitism and the emergence of a climate of intolerance, the Heads of State and Government taking part in the Vienna Summit adopted a Declaration and a Plan of Action on combating racism, xenophobia, antisemitism and intolerance.

The European Commission against Racism and Intolerance (ECRI) was set up as a result of this Plan of Action.

The task of ECRI is to: review member States' legislation, policies and other measures to combat racism, xenophobia, antisemitism and intolerance and their effectiveness; propose further action at local, national and European level; formulate general policy recommendations to member States; study international legal instruments applicable in the matter with a view to their reinforcement where appropriate.

As concern the relevant legislation currently in force in the member States of the Council of Europe, ECRI asked the Swiss Institute of Comparative Law (Lausanne), acting as a consultant, to make a study on this issue. The present report reproduces the results of this study. It should be noted that the study was conducted independently by the Swiss Institute of Comparative Law and does not fall under the responsibility of ECRI, the Council of Europe or its member States.

The European Commission against Racism and Intolerance and the Directorate General of Human Rights of the Council of Europe wish to thank the Swiss Institute of Comparative Law for the very high quality of its work and its constructive co-operation.

States