Children may be confined, but their rights are not!

Most experts and staff working at the Council of Europe have continued work from their homes, using technology and new working methods to achieve their important mission. This includes reviewing the measures taken to manage the COVID-19 pandemic and advising on how to mitigate any negative impact they may have, in particular on people in situation of vulnerability.

On this page, which shall be regularly updated, we are compiling the following :

  • the responses and links to relevant Council of Europe bodies,
  • responses provided by our member States through the Lanzarote Committee (CDENF)
  • a thematic response provided by institutional partners and international or european civil society organisations 
Council of Europe response Council of Europe response

 

We are compiling the responses of Council of Europe bodies to the situations that worry us most and providing information on how to best protect children in their increasing online activities during the crisis.

 

Children can reach the world from home

The global sanitary crisis has brought unprecedented changes in our interactions and routines due to social distancing and confinement. In many countries, only essential businesses are functioning normally while many adults in institutions and companies work from home and children follow their school lessons online. Families, communities, businesses and governments are leaning heavily on internet, digital technology and social media to retain a semblance of normalcy and continue day-to-day activities and also considerably expanding their use for entertainment.

ICTs are allowing children to continue their education and to acquire new skills; to access information and to seek advice and support if they are worried; to play and keep in touch with their peers and loved ones. Screens are helping many children to cope with the confinement, but they are also exposing them to risks. Guidance on some of these challenges provided by different institutions and media can be found under the following headers.


Thematic guidance Thematic guidance

Children can reach the world from home

The global sanitary crisis has brought unprecedented changes in our interactions and routines due to social distancing and confinement. In many countries, only essential businesses are functioning normally while many adults in institutions and companies work from home and children follow their school lessons online. Families, communities, businesses and governments are leaning heavily on internet, digital technology and social media to retain a semblance of normalcy and continue day-to-day activities and also considerably expanding their use for entertainment.

ICTs are allowing children to continue their education and to acquire new skills; to access information and to seek advice and support if they are worried; to play and keep in touch with their peers and loved ones. Screens are helping many children to cope with the confinement, but they are also exposing them to risks. Guidance on some of these challenges provided by different institutions and media can be found under the following headers.


Country initiatives Country initiatives