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International publications regarding gender equality

International publications regarding gender equality

A number of international organisations have published interesting publications on different topics regarding women’s rights and gender equality. UN Women published a youth friendly version of the CEDAW Convention, aiming at making this instrument more accessible for young women. The publications stresses that the Convention reflects a life cycle approach and that state parties are obliged to promote the equal rights of women and girls. The Inter-Parliamentary Union released a very interesting Issue brief on  Sexism, harassment and violence against women parliamentarians. The study’s findings confirm that sexism, harassment and violence against women parliamentarians are very real and widespread. They suggest that the phenomenon knows no boundaries and exists to different degrees in every country. The study’s findings reveal troubling levels of prevalence – particularly for psychological violence, affecting 81.8 per cent of the respondents from all countries and regions. Regarding the forms of psychological violence, 44.4 per cent of those surveyed said they had received threats of death, rape, beatings or abduction during their parliamentary term . While the prevalence of sexual, physical or economic violence is lower, it remains troubling; it affects women parliamentarians in all countries but is most acute in those moving towards, and advocating for, women’s rights, in countries marked by a general context of insecurity and/or hostility towards such rights.

In relation to economic and participation issues, the European Institute for Gender Equality (EIGE) researched the area of poverty from a gender equality perspective  and found out that women are continually at a higher risk of poverty across the European Union (EU) and that some people face a higher risk of poverty than others. For example, almost half of all lone parents are poor and women are particularly affected as they make up 85 % of all one-parent families in the EU. Also migrants face a higher risk of poverty than the native-born population: 41 % of women and 39 % of men born in a non-EU country were at risk of poverty or social exclusion in 2014. Finally, the  Global Gender Gap Report 2016 of the World Economic Forum found that economic equality between women and men could take 170 years after a dramatic slowdown in progress due to chronic gaps in particular in relation to salaries and  labour force participation. On average, the 144 countries covered in the Report have closed 96% of the gap in health outcomes between women and men, unchanged since 2015, and more than 95% of the gap in educational attainment, an improvement of almost one full percentage point since 2015 and the highest value ever measured by the Index. However, the gaps between women and men on economic participation and political empowerment remain wide: only 59% of the economic participation gap has been closed—a reversal on several years of progress and the lowest value measured by the Index since 2008—and about 23% of the political gap, continuing a trend of slow but steady improvement.