Slovenia

ENTRY INTO FORCE of the European Convention on Human Rights

28 June 1994

Number of implemented cases*

307

Examples

Justice for shoemaker who lived without rights for 20 years

In February 1992, over 25,000 people living in Slovenia were automatically stripped of their residency rights. Many of them – including Mustafa Kurić – had their papers taken away, were evicted from apartments, could not work or travel, lost personal possessions or lived in poor conditions. The law was changed and a compensation scheme set up after a ruling from the European Court of Human Rights.

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Parents win fight for justice following their son’s death

Gregor Šilih was 20 when he died in hospital. His parents believed that medical negligence was to blame. They launched legal proceedings to find out the truth. Thirteen years later their claim had still not been resolved. The European court ruled that the authorities had failed to take effective steps to discover the truth. The case led to reforms to prevent the same thing from happening again.

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Justice for thousands of “erased” people after 20 years without rights

In February 1992, 25,671 people in Slovenia were automatically stripped of their right to live there. Many people – including Ana Mezga - had their papers taken away, were evicted from their homes, could not work, lost personal possessions or had their families broken apart. The law was changed and a compensation scheme set up after a ruling from the European Court of Human Rights.

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Magazine made to pay damages for criticising politician’s homophobic behaviour

The magazine Mladina published an article criticising a politician for homophobic remarks in a parliamentary debate. The politician sued the magazine because he had been offended by its criticism. The Slovenian courts ruled against the magazine, ordering it to pay damages. The European court ruled this had violated the magazine’s rights – leading to reforms to protect free speech.

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* This figure includes implemented judgments of the European Court of Human Rights and implemented friendly settlements in litigation before the court. The statistics will be updated annually, at the beginning of each calendar year. Source: the database of the Department for the Execution of Judgments of the ECHR, HUDOC-EXEC.