The Intercultural city aims at building its policies and identity on the explicit acknowledgement that diversity can be a resource for the development of the society.

The first step is the adoption (and implementation) of strategies that facilitate positive intercultural encounters and exchanges, and promote equal and active participation of residents and communities in the development of the city, thus responding to the needs of a diverse population. The Intercultural integration policy model is based on extensive research evidence, on a range of international legal instruments, and on the collective input of the cities member of the Intercultural Cities programme that share their good practice examples on how to better manage diversity, address possible conflicts, and benefit from the diversity advantage.

This section offers examples of intercultural approaches that facilitate the development and implementation of intercultural strategies.

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Intercultural Museum

A museum telling the history, and contributing to the contemporary narrative, of diversity in Norway
2016
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The Intercultural Museum was founded to reflect intercultural reality of Oslo which other museums were failing to do. It was set up as a public foundation which undertook a prize-winning transformation of an old police station and in 2006 merged with two other museums including the old City Museum. Its ethos of respecting diversity and casting an equal gaze was embodied from its inception in its representation– with a majority of people of immigrant background on its management board.

It also conceives of the museum as a space of dialogue involving as wide and diverse a range of people as possible. So it works on issues of mental health and discrimination against gay people, intergenerational relationships as well as intercultural ones and it draws on universal and shared aspects of culture - such as rites of passage - to make connections across ethnic differences.

It has staged more than 100 art exhibitions, performance and courses (painting, dancing, storytelling) for children and youth. It also arranges tours in the most diverse part of the city and tells stories about historic and contemporary immigrant communities and mutual influences between different population groups.

Another important aspect is offering assistance to young people in accessing training and the cultura heritage  job market. Also indirectly helping artists with minority background to enter established networks, and presenting them in the gallery and promoting them to other professional galleries and museums. There is provision of special training in cross-cultural awareness and competence to professionals in the city council and to schoolchildren.

The museum also takes a public stance to advocate the rights of migrants through exhibitions, debates and seminars, including an ong0ing series of public debates and meetings in cooperation with the University of Oslo and the Anti-Racist Centre, tackling controversial themes relevant to diversity in Norway.


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