Health Policy

Health Policy
 

Themes

 

Blood transfusion


Work of the Council of Europe in the blood transfusion area started in the 50ís. The Committees in charge of questions related to blood transfusion are the Committee on Blood Transfusion and Immunohaematology (SP-HM) and the Committee on Quality Assurance in Blood Transfusion Services (SP-R-GS). These Committees built the programme on blood transfusion around three major principles: the non-commercialisation of substances of human origin by voluntary and non-remunerated donation, the goal to achieve self-sufficiency and the protection for both the donors and the recipients.

With these objectives in mind, the Council of Europe concentrated on: studying the ethical, legal and organisational aspects of blood transfusion with a view to ensuring quality, increasing availability of blood, avoiding wastage of human substances, ensuring optimal use and analysing the possible ethical and organisational impact of new scientific developments.

 
 

Recommendations


Publications


Activities of blood banks in the Council of Europe Member States related to bone marrow transplantations

Report on the collection, testing and use of blood and blood products in Europe
2003
2002
2001


Health Policy, Development and Promotion


The Council of Europe focused on several aspects of health policy, such as the media awareness of their responsibility to provide the right information at the right time, or the quality improvement of health services and policies. Changes of society were also taken into account through an exam of the multicultural societies now existing in most member States and of their way to recognise in health services and institutions the different concepts of health, illness, death and provision of care as influenced by different cultures and origins.
Finally, also criteria to promote health policies became object of a Recommendation of the Committee of Ministers.

 

Recommendations


Publications


Report on Criteria for the management of waiting lists and waiting times in health care
Final Report of the Committee of experts on criteria for preventative policies and health promotion

Transplantation


Organ transplantation is a life-saving operation which should be accessible for all who need it. Today, organ transplantation is the best available established technique for the treatment of failure of most essential organs, such as liver, kidney, heart and lungs. With the development of new modern techniques, many patients can now expect long and high quality life. The importance and demand for transplantation of tissues and cells is also growing.
From the Council of Europe perspective, promoting organ donation and transplantation is an important part of human rights. Improving transplantation systems means assuring a right to healthcare, and a right to life.

Recommendations


Publications


Replies to the questionnaire for member states on organ trafficking
Organ shortage: current status and strategies for improvement of organ donation - A European consensus document

Newsletter Transplant
2006
2005
2004

Patients' role


The concept of citizen and patient participation in the decision-making process has been developing at all levels of society in order to make health services more responsive to the needs of users and more democratic. Patients and citizens are becoming more demanding concerning their own needs and the quality of health care they receive. More and more people are aware of the need to be better informed.

Recommendations


 

Palliative care


The issue of palliative care extends well beyond the patient to include family members and care - givers. It also extends beyond the physical suffering to embrace the whole area of the quality of life of the patient. The Council of Europe took therefore into consideration palliative care in the wider context of the environment in which it is practised.

Recommendations


2nd Global Summit of National Hospice and Palliative Care Associations: Declaration on Hospice and Palliative Care (2005)
"The need for more palliative care" by Piotr Mierzewski, head of the Health Policy Division. Abstract from the book "Ethical eye: euthanasia" (2004)
Dissemination of the Council of Europe Recommendation on the organisation of palliative care

Vulnerable groups


Along the years several committees of experts worked in order to create a European standard of health policy in favour of the vulnerable groups of society, such as: chronically ill persons, elderly people, marginalised populations, prisoners or single parents' families.

Recommendations


Introductory paper on the adaptation of health care services to the demand for health care and health care services of people in marginal situations
Report on the Organisation of health care services in prisons in European member states
Report on Psycho-Social Aspects of Single-Parent Families