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THE PROGRAMME
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CHILDREN'S RIGHTS
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Children in care

 
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Case-law: European Court of Human Rights
CHILDREN AND VIOLENCE
Action Programme

 
CoE Guidelines against violence
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DOCUMENTS AND SPEECHES
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THE TEAM


Violence in media and cyberspace 
 

 
Safety on the Internet

Wild Web Woods - an online game for Internet safety and respect of human rights
More on Internet safety

Activities and conferences

Pan-European Forum on "Human rights in the information society - empowering children and young people (Yerevan, 5-6 October 2006. The forum's aim was to:
- examine ways to inform children and young people on exercising human rights online, and teach them how to deal  responsibly  with potentially harmful online content and behaviour;
- to encourage and facilitate multi-stakeholder dialogue and action in media education, in particular with regard to common educational standards, best practices and human rights awareness. 
See: general conference report
Media and Information Society Division website
 

Points of view

The Secretary General, Terry Davis, warns against "child predators in cyberspace"
 
Legal texts

Committee of Ministers Recommendation Rec(2006)12 on empowering children in the new information and communications environment

Convention on cybercrime (CETS No. 185) Article 9 refers to offences related to child pornography.

20 February 2008: Committee of Ministers Declaration on protecting the dignity, security and privacy of children on the Internet.
The traceability of children on the Web may expose them to grooming for sexual purposes, discrimination, stalking and other forms of harassment. Children need to be informed of the risks and ways to avoid them. In addition, the right to privacy is not always respected. Taking into account previous work of the both the United Nations and the Council of Europe, the declaration calls for no lasting or permanently accessible record of the child-created content on the Internet which "challenges their dignity, security and private, or otherwise renders them vulnerable now or at a later state in their lives".